The Presence and Development of Slacklining in Las Vegas

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Photo: pixabay.com

Las Vegas truly embodies the notion of being “Entertainment Capital of the World” by featuring a plethora of events that capture the essence of the city. Yes, it’s still synonymous with casinos, but with the constant growth in technology and the emergence of many amusement venues, the desert has had no other choice but to adapt.

Casinos, as you might have known by now, have branched out from the typical land-based establishments to their similarly viable online counterparts to provide gamers with convenient options without losing the authentic experience. More platforms began exploring this idea, so much so that the likes of Gala Casino started providing welcome bonuses and live dealers streaming features to new players. This is just a simple reflection of Las Vegas’ continuous evolution and how it embraces the general concept of innovative entertainment.

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Photo: Wikipedia.org

Part of the constant growth in Las Vegas is its audience’s acceptance of a rather odd yet growing event such as slacklining. For one, the city hosted Andy Lewis’ attempt to break the world record for longest distance walked on a slackline in an urban environment. According to Review Journal, the Moab, Utah daredevil traversed 360 feet on a one-inch wide line, 480 feet above the world-famous Strip as a way to promote the sport.

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Photo: Wikipedia.org

 

Another proof that slacklining has sort of become a thing in Las Vegas is its inclusion in the widely renowned spectacle Cirque du Soleil. In their special tribute show named Michael Jackson ONE, the group incorporated slackliners during its rendition of the pop icon’s hit song ‘Bad’. The performance featured death-defying stunts, high-energy performances, and, of course, all the heart-stopping facets of the up-and-coming sport.

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Photo: Yogaslackers.com

Lastly, a group called Yoga Slackers embarked on a 30,000-mile, cross-country tour of North America last 2014 to encourage interested parties into taking up this mix of sport and wellness. One of the stops was in Las Vegas, Nevada at the Red Rocks Rendezvous, where participants learned the basics of Slackline and Acro Yoga. The instructors, Sam and Racquel, even taught them Slackro, which is a combination of slacklining and acrobatics. This event, may, or may not, have sparked the institution of the Las Vegas Slackline Group.

In a way, slacklining in Las Vegas mirrors the development of its iconic casinos and other entertainment venues. Both areas effectively diversified and took a new direction to reach wider audiences, coming up with a worthwhile activity that fits the overall vibe of an equally fascinating and highly intriguing city.

LIVING IN A VAN | PART 3 | DISPELLING THE HASHTAG ‘VANLIFE’ MYTH

There’s a lot of hashtag hype going around at the moment regarding #VanLife. I’m not even sure I feel comfortable using that term, considering how it has started to gain momentum within the mainstream, surprise surprise, in a rather deceptive direction.
It’s interesting because when I moved in to a van it was not popular, it definitely didn’t have a hashtag and was not sold to me as being a glamping option; not as a weekend package nor a way of life. Might I add, when I first came across the hashtag hype a couple of years later, it was #homeiswhereyouparkit popularised by the legend, Foster Huntingdon. That was when living in a van wasn’t cool. Now look what’s happened.

Upon first draft, I entitled this post ‘Shitting in a bag is not glamorous’, because that statement is true if you’ve ever been fortunate enough to experience the process.

Quitting your well paid job to travel continents in your confined, pinewood, rolling conversion, which is barely big enough to spread your supermarket fecal-capturing device, accompanied by your lover who you describe with something flimsy like ‘bohemian’, is not Van Life. It’s a glorified sabbatical with a romantic, edited-by-head-office-twist and I can only wish my dingy, electricity-free existence was half as sexy. Or as shallow.

Read on as I debunk the romance of being one above homeless. Again.

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The Gymnastic Bodies Coach Sommer Interview | The Cloudfoot Diaries #67

Christopher Sommer Gymnastic Bodies

Coach Sommer
doesn’t really need an introduction from me. If you’ve never heard of him, it’s worth your time checking him out. In a nutshell, he’s coached a load of gymnasts to championship level over a few decades and knows what it takes to build a real gymnastic body – one that can function and perform to a high level but can also adapt and manage day-to-day realities and challenges. Sans bullshit.

Tim Ferriss did a wicked interview with Sommer, questioning him lots on the training process and various important points surrounding it.

A personal favourite takeaway from the interview was that it takes 211(+/-) days for soft tissue to adapt to a stimulus, apparently. I didn’t know it took that long for a change to be made but it makes sense when you realise muscle adapts nearly twice as fast compared to other softer tissues.

In terms of your own experience, what’s easier to build in less time, guns or range of motion?
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My first time to the Moto GP Assen 2016: Cults, Crashes and Upgrades | The Cloudfoot Diaries #66

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Cult – a devout following to an ideal, person or thing.

The Valentino Rossi 46 cult is one of the most passionate groups I have had the pleasure to be amongst, and yes, it is a cult. It’s not a malicious or sadistic one, though, just very yellow. The ferocity of Rossi fans is well up there, alongside the followers of Football, Religion, Fashion and Money, which are arguably far more lethal.

To the giallo-masses that follow him, Rossi is a God. Literally, a God. For those of you who have no idea who I am refering to, and how dare you, he’s been competing for the last 20 years as a professional motorcycle racer and is a multi-champion. Due to a fortunate combination of exceptional skill, charming demeanour and expressive charisma, Rossi has risen to the status of God the world over, not just in Italy.

I visited the TT Racetrack in Assen, Holland, recently for the annual Moto GP event, making the pilgramage with friends from London. It seems the Moto GP pilgramage is something that all bike riders will undergo once in their lifetime; a pious journey that really is only understood and appreciated by those who have ridden a motorbike into a corner far too fast and survived. It was a powerful, passionate experience and because of the various forces at play, I’d like to delve a little deeper.

Assen Moto GP 2

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How Weightlifting Gave Me Patellar Tendonitis | The Cloudfoot Diaries #65

Now that I have your attention, this post should have been called ‘How I Gave Myself Patellar Tendonitis’.
Why?
Because it doesn’t really matter what the sport or activity is, if you’re body has a weak link, it has a weak link. The straw that breaks the camel’s back can represent any discipline. Shit, it can even be bending down to pick up the mail off of the floor. Where there are weaknesses, there are heightened probabilities of those weaknesses being exposed whenever you move the body around. Especially, if like me, you are a moving human who enjoys moving through new planes and axes and exploring just what is possible.

Patellar Tendonitis Diagram

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Hanging and Handstands : Simplicity can be Complex | The Cloudfoot Diaries #64

One of the great tasks for any training programme is keeping it simple. Over complication seems to obey the law of entropy; increased chaos over time is inevitable, unless you reign it in.
Strength and Conditioning seems to look at the basic motions of the human body; push, pull, rotate, hinge etc and build exercises around that.

Two of the most beneficial upper body basic motions I’ve been playing with have been hanging and handstands. Not only do they complement each other in terms of opposite forces but they seem to allow nature, gravity more specifically, to act on the body and work its magic.

The latest addition to Locker 27 has been the infamous Bachar Ladder. Created by free solo climbing legend, John Bachar, this ladder system is as simple as it gets. Which is what makes it so hard. Sequential pulling movements are possible, so combined with a pull-up bar, you can turn yourself into a weapon in no time.

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10 Realisations for Combining Weightlifting with Gymnastics; Months 4-8 | The Cloudfoot Diaries #63

8 months in to my Weightlifting journey and I’ve come away with some valuable lessons and realisations as to how to combine weightlifting with gymnastics training – a self-experiment that I’ve been delving into, despite there being not a lot of info out there.

Without futher ado…

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September Slackline Workshops @ Boulder Brighton

septemberslacklineBBIt’s been a super busy summer – catch me at the tail end of our seasonal fun in the sun, this weekend at Boulder Brighton Climbing Centre’s Climbing Festival teaching 30 minute slacklining workshops, all abilities welcome!

 

 

Rest in Peace Dean Potter, you Wildman.

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5 years ago I was sat behind a computer surfing YouTube for whatever life-inspiring, risk taking madness I could find to ease my lack of direction in life. It’s a process one finds oneself in sporadically when motivation is low, senses dulled. I was in New Zealand at the time. I had the shared house to myself, leaving me to plugin to the web, searching for answers. That’s when I stumbled upon a 5 part documentary called ‘SkyWalker’.

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Combining Weightlifting with Gymnastics; Weeks 5-12 | The Cloudfoot Diaries #62

fitnessweightsThe second block of combining weightlifting with gymnastics is in full effect. Some changes had to be made; the tendons were getting spicy from too much work and the neural fatigue was setting in. Time for a reconfiguration. And if you’re wondering what the above picture has to do with any of this? It doesn’t.

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