No Gi Reflections #3 | John Danaher – Jits, Darwinian Theory and Coaching 101

I could listen to John Danaher speak for hours on end. There’s not a lot of press or content surrounding the guy but believe me, as and when I find it, I will post it!

This is a fantastic interview that elicits a little insight towards John’s approach to his coaching system, his ideas behind his world view (based on Darwinian Theory) and some interesting thoughts behind the phenomonon of violence.

 

No Gi Reflections #2 | ‘Invisible’ Jiu Jitsu and applying the ‘stick’

Rickson Gracie, arguably one of the best jiu jitsu players to walk this earth, has a concept known as Invisible Jiu Jitsu.

Rather than me try to laboriously explain it, the video below does a good job. Two things to bear in mind, however.

1) From my Wing Chun background, I found it far more comprehensive to think of this invisibility in terms of the ‘Stick’ that is spoken about within drills like Chi Sao, or Sticking Hands.

2) If the above makes no sense to you at all but you’re familiar with Weightlifting or Powerlifting terminology, think of the invisibility factor as the equivalent of taking the slack out of the bar. Except it’s more like taking the slack out of the contact with your opponent.

 

Now comes the interesting and lengthy process of applying this concept to the mat. Sensitivity takes a long time to develop and with such a fast pace in the No Gi world, it makes for an extra challenge!

No Gi Reflections #1 | Transfer of skills from Muay Thai to No Gi BJJ

Muay Thai BJJ

No Gi Reflections is my blogging series that reveals insights from my own journey with No Gi training and practice, as well as revelations and lessons from training others.

For the past few months I’ve had the pleasure of training stuntman Doug Robson of Kaskadare stunts in the basic applications of grappling; mainly No Gi Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and Wrestling, down at the ever-impressive Locker 27. His background is varied, predominantly based in Muay Thai from what he’s explained to me.

What I’ve found interesting since teaching Doug is how fast he has adapted to moving on the floor once he understood the various principles of weight displacement, how to move and scoot the hips, and most notably, engaging the legs. I’ve boiled this down to Muay Thai. Why? Because I’ve recently started teaching world, european and british Muay Thai champion, Sheree Halliday, in the same fashion, and her adaptation has been very similar.

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Queuing with good-looking cattle; when Fury met Patience | The Cloudfoot Diaries #69

Models Queue

Hey, sorry for the short notice but you know how these things are…,” started the message. It was an honest introduction, more so than usual and it had caught my ego’s attention.

[Big UK Brand] are casting for their AW16 / SS17 lookbook today and have asked to see you.” Me!? Little old moi!? My ego began to dilate, rapidly, salivating like Golem at what this could mean.
I’ve been selected.
I’ve been noticed.

Funny how the ego feeds off of recognition and the illusion of being unique, isn’t it? Needless to say, I had already fallen for these traps and instead of taking a step back, re-assessing the message, its contents and subliminal meanings, I was already on my motorcycle smashing it to central London before my balls were too swollen to ride.

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Floatation Tanks – My first experience of sensory deprivation craziness | The Cloudfoot Diaries #68

I first read about the borderline-crazy invention of an ‘Isolation Tank‘ in a book called ‘The Centre of the Cyclone’ by a very interesting chap named John C. Lilly. That was a few years back and I’d never forgotten about the possibility that one day, I too would climb into a pitch black box filled with salty water to try and trip my balls off.

Since listening to a podcast called The Joe Rogan Experience (highly recommended) I discovered that the host had a tank installed in his house and I became exposed to floating, yet again. Joe clearly was a massive fan of the float tank, as he had his own wizard build him one (spicy pricey). Check it out;


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The Presence and Development of Slacklining in Las Vegas *Sponsored Content*

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Photo: pixabay.com

Las Vegas truly embodies the notion of being “Entertainment Capital of the World” by featuring a plethora of events that capture the essence of the city. Yes, it’s still synonymous with casinos, but with the constant growth in technology and the emergence of many amusement venues, the desert has had no other choice but to adapt.

Casinos, as you might have known by now, have branched out from the typical land-based establishments to their similarly viable online counterparts to provide gamers with convenient options without losing the authentic experience. More platforms began exploring this idea, so much so that the likes of Gala Casino started providing welcome bonuses and live dealers streaming features to new players. This is just a simple reflection of Las Vegas’ continuous evolution and how it embraces the general concept of innovative entertainment.

AndyLewis1

Photo: Wikipedia.org

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LIVING IN A VAN | PART 3 | DISPELLING THE HASHTAG ‘VANLIFE’ MYTH

There’s a lot of hashtag hype going around at the moment regarding #VanLife. I’m not even sure I feel comfortable using that term, considering how it has started to gain momentum within the mainstream, surprise surprise, in a rather deceptive direction.
It’s interesting because when I moved in to a van it was not popular, it definitely didn’t have a hashtag and was not sold to me as being a glamping option; not as a weekend package nor a way of life. Might I add, when I first came across the hashtag hype a couple of years later, it was #homeiswhereyouparkit popularised by the legend, Foster Huntingdon. That was when living in a van wasn’t cool. Now look what’s happened.

Upon first draft, I entitled this post ‘Shitting in a bag is not glamorous’, because that statement is true if you’ve ever been fortunate enough to experience the process.

Quitting your well paid job to travel continents in your confined, pinewood, rolling conversion, which is barely big enough to spread your supermarket fecal-capturing device, accompanied by your lover who you describe with something flimsy like ‘bohemian’, is not Van Life. It’s a glorified sabbatical with a romantic, edited-by-head-office-twist and I can only wish my dingy, electricity-free existence was half as sexy. Or as shallow.

Read on as I debunk the romance of being one above homeless. Again.

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The Gymnastic Bodies Coach Sommer Interview | The Cloudfoot Diaries #67

Christopher Sommer Gymnastic Bodies

Coach Sommer
doesn’t really need an introduction from me. If you’ve never heard of him, it’s worth your time checking him out. In a nutshell, he’s coached a load of gymnasts to championship level over a few decades and knows what it takes to build a real gymnastic body – one that can function and perform to a high level but can also adapt and manage day-to-day realities and challenges. Sans bullshit.

Tim Ferriss did a wicked interview with Sommer, questioning him lots on the training process and various important points surrounding it.

A personal favourite takeaway from the interview was that it takes 211(+/-) days for soft tissue to adapt to a stimulus, apparently. I didn’t know it took that long for a change to be made but it makes sense when you realise muscle adapts nearly twice as fast compared to other softer tissues.

In terms of your own experience, what’s easier to build in less time, guns or range of motion?
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My first time to the Moto GP Assen 2016: Cults, Crashes and Upgrades | The Cloudfoot Diaries #66

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Cult – a devout following to an ideal, person or thing.

The Valentino Rossi 46 cult is one of the most passionate groups I have had the pleasure to be amongst, and yes, it is a cult. It’s not a malicious or sadistic one, though, just very yellow. The ferocity of Rossi fans is well up there, alongside the followers of Football, Religion, Fashion and Money, which are arguably far more lethal.

To the giallo-masses that follow him, Rossi is a God. Literally, a God. For those of you who have no idea who I am refering to, and how dare you, he’s been competing for the last 20 years as a professional motorcycle racer and is a multi-champion. Due to a fortunate combination of exceptional skill, charming demeanour and expressive charisma, Rossi has risen to the status of God the world over, not just in Italy.

I visited the TT Racetrack in Assen, Holland, recently for the annual Moto GP event, making the pilgramage with friends from London. It seems the Moto GP pilgramage is something that all bike riders will undergo once in their lifetime; a pious journey that really is only understood and appreciated by those who have ridden a motorbike into a corner far too fast and survived. It was a powerful, passionate experience and because of the various forces at play, I’d like to delve a little deeper.

Assen Moto GP 2

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How Weightlifting Gave Me Patellar Tendonitis | The Cloudfoot Diaries #65

Now that I have your attention, this post should have been called ‘How I Gave Myself Patellar Tendonitis’.
Why?
Because it doesn’t really matter what the sport or activity is, if you’re body has a weak link, it has a weak link. The straw that breaks the camel’s back can represent any discipline. Shit, it can even be bending down to pick up the mail off of the floor. Where there are weaknesses, there are heightened probabilities of those weaknesses being exposed whenever you move the body around. Especially, if like me, you are a moving human who enjoys moving through new planes and axes and exploring just what is possible.

Patellar Tendonitis Diagram

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